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Tumblr Makes The Move For Money

March 10th, 2010 1 Comment

REBLOGGED FROM SHEY.NET:

Tumblr launched one of its first revenue-generating programs today, allowing a select group of blogs (not sure how they’re selected, but the three options it gave me happened to be my three most popular blogs) to feature themselves in the Tumblr directory for a nominal fee — categories range from about $9 to $19 to feature your blog for a week. Here’s the link.

The process is ridiculously easy and fun — I tried it out and featured shey.net in about ten minutes (including Photoshop time) while visiting the Tumblr gang at their office today. The results were almost instant — as soon as the feature went up, I saw new followers start popping up in my timeline (thanks, guys!).

Screen shots of the process below.

1. Enter your info:

2. Get thanked:

3. In your face, Gary and Dens!

HERE’S WHERE I CHIME IN:

This is a great assist for a money-making basket (follow the basketball metaphor please); however, you still have to shoot a three-pointer not a lay-up.

The traffic comes your way, but to pay the rent from your blog you must:

  1. Maintain their attention.
  2. Manipulate tumblr to facilitate ads.

Neither can be done by a rookie.

Tim Shey, who blogged this entry, is actually a headof the one of the web’s largest video content distributors, NextNewNetworks (that co-produced TMI and LifeExperiment).  That didn’t happen over night.  On a MUCH smaller scale, I came into the blogosphere with a built-in audience and guidance from other leaders in the industry.

Your Tumblr blog can be monetized, it’s just not as easy as a click.  That’s all I’m saying.

UPDATE from Twitter: @Moth (TimShey) The lovely + intelligent @MaryRambin points out why my last post was titled “Make Me Famous” and not “Make Me Rich.” :)

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  • Patrick

    It’s a good idea at first, until everyone starts paying $19 for their Tumblr to be listed in the directory. Then people will start disregarding the directory because they will say that those are now just people who paid money to be listed. They are there because of that and not because their blogs are noteworthy. Maybe Tumblr should have a two-tiered directory. A paid section for people who want to get noticed, and a nominated section for Tumblrs that are exceptional.